SAMUDRA Report

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Issue No:74
  • :August
  • :2016

Sandcastle

On an empty beach
in sunlight
I built my castle
the wind was my architect
together we sculpted
soft curves from the dunes
I found ribbons of seaweed
sprawling like handwriting
in the tideline of debris
washed from the sea of knowledge
with these I garlanded the walls
I made a roof from shells
that giggled stories about crabby hermits
and boring barnacles
someone has spilt black
tar on my castle
ink black sticky stains
that burn where they touch me
that burn
—Gabriellr Maughan

Analysis

INLAND FISHERIES

A Valuable Resource

The value of small-scale inland fisheries lies in its ability to provide essential protein, micronutrients, vitamins and fats for millions of people, particularly in developing countries


This article is by Devin M. Bartley (Devin.Bartley@fao.org), Simon Funge-Smith (Simon.FungeSmith@fao.org), Gerd Marmulla (Gerd.Marmulla@fao.org), Nicole Franz (Nicole.Franz@fao.org) and Felix Marttin (Felix.Marttin@fao.org) of the Fisheries and Aquaculture Department of FAO, Rome


Inland fisheries are almost all small-scale fisheries (SSF). The problems of inland fisheries are SSF problems and include access rights, tenure, gender, social welfare and empowerment. More than 60 mn people rely on inland fisheries for at least part of their livelihood and about half of them are women. An estimated 71 low-income countries, in fact, currently produce about 80 per cent of global inland capture fishery production. Inland capture fisheries provide essential protein, micronutrients, vitamins and fats for millions of people, particularly in developing countries.

Although there have been improvements in technology and efficiency for industrial fishing, for many small-scale fishers the hooks-and-line, traps, crowding and aggregating devices, and fixed...

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