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Aquaculture

Almost 46 percent of the world’s total fish production in 2018 came from aquaculture, up from 25.7 percent in 2000. The sub-sector is also a growing employer across the world. It employs over one-third of all the global work force in fisheries and aquaculture—35 percent in 2018, up from 17 percent in 1990. It is expected to contribute 48 percent of global fish production by 2030. Investor interest in aquaculture is increasing in many countries, especially in Asia.

Such economic growth must be matched with socio-environmental concerns. New trends in aquaculture activities need to be identified. Occupational safety and health issues need to be addressed, while accounting for women’s work, social development and gender relations. Crucially, any threats to fishing communities from aquaculture operations, including their tenure rights, must be addressed. There is also a need to outline responsible practices and appropriate forms of small-scale aquaculture.

ICSF’s aquaculture programme will look at how the sector can contribute to Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) by 2030. How to better understand this growth and its implications. How to secure local community rights over water bodies. How to build capacities, use local species that contribute to food security.

In 2010 ICSF and Kolkata’s Inland Fisheries Society of India (IFSI) held a workshop titled ‘Small Indigenous Freshwater Fish Species: Their Role in Poverty Alleviation, Food Security and Conservation of Biodiversity’ to bring together stakeholders. It highlighted the role of small indigenous freshwater fish species (SIFFS)—of unique nutritional benefit if cooked in traditional ways—in rural food and livelihood security, as also in conserving biodiversity. Their socioeconomic and cultural relevance, how to enhance access, especially of women, to better income and nutrition.

ICSF will launch a new programme in 2020 to study India’s aquaculture systems to promote sustainable development and a human rights-based approach.

Current Programmes

Aquaculture is poised for boom all over the world especially in countries like India where it is traditionally practised. ICSF launched a new programme in 2020 to study India’s aquaculture systems to promote sustainable development and a human rights-based approach. India’s Neel Kranti Mission (Mission Blue Revolution) aims to triple fish production, especially from aquaculture.

Resources

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Achieving Blue Growth: Building vibrant fisheries and aquaculture communities By FAO, 2018

Like the Green Economy principles that preceded it, FAO’s Blue Growth Initiative emphasizes the three pillars of sustainable development– economic, environmental and social – so that fisheries and aquaculture contribute…

Report of the ninth session of the Sub-Committee on Aquaculture. Rome, Italy, 24–27 October 2017 By FAO 2017

The ninth session of the Sub-Committee on Aquaculture (SCA) of the FAO Committee on Fisheries (COFI) recognized the growing significance of sustainable aquaculture development for global food security, nutrition, and…

Report of the ninth session of the Sub-Committee on Aquaculture. Rome, Italy, 24–27 October 2017

The ninth session of the Sub-Committee on Aquaculture (SCA) of the FAO Committee on Fisheries (COFI) recognized the growing significance of sustainable aquaculture development for global food security, nutrition, and…

Achieving Blue Growth: Building vibrant fisheries and aquaculture communities

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Like the Green Economy principles that preceded it, FAO’s Blue Growth Initiative emphasizes the three pillars of sustainable development– economic, environmental and social – so that fisheries and aquaculture contribute…