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Issue No.51
  • :0973-1156
  • :April
  • :2016

Another International Women’s Day (March 8) has gone by, with significant achievements for women in the fisheries across the world. However, while we take stock of, and celebrate the achievements, we should also reflect on the long road of struggle ahead—a struggle for the rights of small-scale fisheries; for the rights of women engaged in fishing, fish trade and fish-work.

Women have always been the backbone of the small-scale fisheries sector across the world. However the contribution of women, both in economic and social terms, have been constantly undervalued.

From the Editor

Another International Women’s Day (March 8) has gone by, with significant achievements for women in the fisheries across the world. However, while we take stock of, and celebrate the achievements, we should also reflect on the long road of struggle ahead—a struggle for the rights of small-scale fisheries; for the rights of women engaged in fishing, fish trade and fish-work.

Women have always been the backbone of the small-scale fisheries sector across the world. However the contribution of women, both in economic and social terms, have been constantly undervalued. Their “informal” inputs, whether in gear repair, provisioning for fishing trips, maintaining accounts and various post-harvest activities are often unpaid labour and not accounted for while calculating the contribution of the sector. Even when women are compensated for their effort, their work is undervalued and paid less than the same work done by men. This “invisibilising” of women’s work negatively affects their bargaining power, within the family, within the community, and even in state level institutions and policy making for the sector. This issue of Yemaya discusses the need for a more complex and c

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